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Livraison 13
Edito
Livraison, a contemporary arts journal and, on the  occasion of this issue, a journal of graphic design, addresses the field  of language and typography. Physical matter of writing and of the thought that it  materializes, typography is the meeting point of a linguistic content  and a visual sign, of an idea and the shape it is given in order  to maintain it. By its shape, its origin and its style, typeface engages  its own history into that encounter, and becomes the vehicle of a rival  meaning that cannot be dismissed. Out of this overlapping of signs –  plastic/linguistic – surfaces a discourse on discourse, a meta-discourse  where the possibilities of enunciation are determined by the endless  options provided by typographic production.
The shape of a letter refers to a culture, a time,  and a context. By overlaying typographic languages of different times,  Peter Bil’ak’s History updates these references, and answers to Frutiger  with a higher bid: inverted Univers, History noisily surfaces out of an  additive mix, whereas the spare skeleton of Frutiger’s font was the  result of a subtractive synthesis. “History” is also examined in the  contributions by Benoît Buquet, Sonia de Puineuf, and Victor Guégan, in  the light of avant-garde languages. Relying on the artistic excitement  in early 20th century, Olivier Deloignon addresses the immediacy of  signs imposed on onlookers in the time of reading. But if         the language of the sign can be deduced from its historical  mutations, the sans serif lineal seems to challenge that legacy: Annick  Lantenois resumes the study of functionalist radicalism and the will to  “negotiate with the negative connotations associated to emptiness and  void” in 20th century.
The issue of connotation, beyond its moral value, is  an opportunity for Stéphane Darricau to come back to the difficult  problem of the choice of type – one among others – and the consequences.  A literary text, a shop sign, a name in the end credits of a movie…  the ubiquitous typographic shape changes our perception of information.  Vivien Philizot examines the use value of typeface by replacing it in a  specifically human context that works out a large part of the practices,  tastes, fashions, conventions, codes and rules producing the social  relationships of both producers and readers.  Typing a word, a sentence or a text, means displacing its meaning;  and that meaning escapes its enunciation. Robert Bringhurst reminds us  that “typography is to literature what musical performance is to  composition: an essential act of interpretation […]”(1). The  musicality of letters and language is explored in contributions by  Pierre Rœsch, Jean-Baptiste Levée, and in the recent work of Luc(as) de  Groot on phonetic characters. Changing points of view, figured language  extends the scope of research to literature, modulated by letter  drawing. Lucille Guigon – having recently completed a post-degree  program at the Ecole Supérieure d’Art et de Design in Amiens – also  explores the field of language with a typographic creation that sculpts  text and subtly diverts perception. Alejandro Lo Celso grounds his own  work on the universe of Perec by proposing a large family of characters  of the same name; Roxane Jubert, collaborating with artist M.A.  Thébault, delivers a typographic “play” under constraint based on the  sonority of letter J; and Titus Nemeth, with his Nassim, reintroduces  the issue of relationships between different writing systems.
But typography, as an “art of writing  artificially”(2), remains subjected to science and technology. This  field is invested by Caroline Fabès and Sébastien Truchet – both also  having graduated at the school of Amiens – who systematically  and mathematically deconstruct the material of text and letter. At the  limits of visibility, Minuscule by Thomas Huot-Marchand tests the habits  and the abilities of readers. Articulating signs, words, and texts,  Kader Mokaddem presents a series of textual mappings – a work completed  with the students of the École Supérieure d’Art et de Design in  Saint-Étienne. In a nearby approach, Fabrice Sabatier addresses short  forms, between        irony and the derisiveness of the everyday.
By opening new lines of thought and crossing  itineraries, this specific issue wishes to explore the relationships  that typography maintains with language, a structuring feature of our  relationship to the world. Typographically figured, the field of  language is reorganized in a transversal way. More than any other visual  practice, typography cannot do without the speech that goes through it,  nor can it spare its creators bound to update its conditions of  existence

Livraison 13

Edito

Livraison, a contemporary arts journal and, on the occasion of this issue, a journal of graphic design, addresses the field of language and typography.
Physical matter of writing and of the thought that it materializes, typography is the meeting point of a linguistic content and a visual sign, of an idea and the shape it is given in order to maintain it. By its shape, its origin and its style, typeface engages its own history into that encounter, and becomes the vehicle of a rival meaning that cannot be dismissed. Out of this overlapping of signs – plastic/linguistic – surfaces a discourse on discourse, a meta-discourse where the possibilities of enunciation are determined by the endless options provided by typographic production.

The shape of a letter refers to a culture, a time, and a context. By overlaying typographic languages of different times, Peter Bil’ak’s History updates these references, and answers to Frutiger with a higher bid: inverted Univers, History noisily surfaces out of an additive mix, whereas the spare skeleton of Frutiger’s font was the result of a subtractive synthesis. “History” is also examined in the contributions by Benoît Buquet, Sonia de Puineuf, and Victor Guégan, in the light of avant-garde languages. Relying on the artistic excitement in early 20th century, Olivier Deloignon addresses the immediacy of signs imposed on onlookers in the time of reading. But if the language of the sign can be deduced from its historical mutations, the sans serif lineal seems to challenge that legacy: Annick Lantenois resumes the study of functionalist radicalism and the will to “negotiate with the negative connotations associated to emptiness and void” in 20th century.

The issue of connotation, beyond its moral value, is an opportunity for Stéphane Darricau to come back to the difficult problem of the choice of type – one among others – and the consequences. A literary text, a shop sign, a name in the end credits of a movie… the ubiquitous typographic shape changes our perception of information. Vivien Philizot examines the use value of typeface by replacing it in a specifically human context that works out a large part of the practices, tastes, fashions, conventions, codes and rules producing the social relationships of both producers and readers.
Typing a word, a sentence or a text, means displacing its meaning; and that meaning escapes its enunciation. Robert Bringhurst reminds us that “typography is to literature what musical performance is to composition: an essential act of interpretation […]”(1). The musicality of letters and language is explored in contributions by Pierre Rœsch, Jean-Baptiste Levée, and in the recent work of Luc(as) de Groot on phonetic characters. Changing points of view, figured language extends the scope of research to literature, modulated by letter drawing. Lucille Guigon – having recently completed a post-degree program at the Ecole Supérieure d’Art et de Design in Amiens – also explores the field of language with a typographic creation that sculpts text and subtly diverts perception. Alejandro Lo Celso grounds his own work on the universe of Perec by proposing a large family of characters of the same name; Roxane Jubert, collaborating with artist M.A. Thébault, delivers a typographic “play” under constraint based on the sonority of letter J; and Titus Nemeth, with his Nassim, reintroduces the issue of relationships between different writing systems.

But typography, as an “art of writing artificially”(2), remains subjected to science and technology. This field is invested by Caroline Fabès and Sébastien Truchet – both also having graduated at the school of Amiens – who systematically and mathematically deconstruct the material of text and letter. At the limits of visibility, Minuscule by Thomas Huot-Marchand tests the habits and the abilities of readers. Articulating signs, words, and texts, Kader Mokaddem presents a series of textual mappings – a work completed with the students of the École Supérieure d’Art et de Design in Saint-Étienne. In a nearby approach, Fabrice Sabatier addresses short forms, between irony and the derisiveness of the everyday.

By opening new lines of thought and crossing itineraries, this specific issue wishes to explore the relationships that typography maintains with language, a structuring feature of our relationship to the world. Typographically figured, the field of language is reorganized in a transversal way. More than any other visual practice, typography cannot do without the speech that goes through it, nor can it spare its creators bound to update its conditions of existence

5 notes

braykz:

oase 71

braykz:

oase 71

(via anerio)

16 notes

bohemea:

Natalia Vodianova - Vogue Paris by Mert & Marcus, March 2012

bohemea:

Natalia Vodianova - Vogue Paris by Mert & Marcus, March 2012

237 notes

magazine Quaderns #261 (july 2011)

magazine Quaderns #261 (july 2011)

(Source: )

5 notes


Intelligence in Lifestyle or IL is a relatively young Italian  magazine about contemporary passions and consumptions. It premiered in  September of 2008, and like T Magazine, the style supplement of The New York Times, IL is the supplement to the Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 ORE.  The design takes inspiration from Swiss formalism, fashion magazines,  and popular Italian & Northern European periodicals from the 70s.

Intelligence in Lifestyle or IL is a relatively young Italian magazine about contemporary passions and consumptions. It premiered in September of 2008, and like T Magazine, the style supplement of The New York Times, IL is the supplement to the Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 ORE. The design takes inspiration from Swiss formalism, fashion magazines, and popular Italian & Northern European periodicals from the 70s.

6 notes

design : Sawdust
Client
Novum — World of Graphic Design
Details
Typographic cover “Like your work love your wife” from the film Planes, Trains and Automobiles 
— quote by John Candy.
2009

design : Sawdust

Client
Novum — World of Graphic Design

Details
Typographic cover “Like your work love your wife” from the film Planes, Trains and Automobiles 
— quote by John Candy.

2009

1 note

Quaderns d’arquitectura i urbanisme is the journal of the Association of Architects of Catalonia
issue #263
Traditionally, preservation has been understood as the crystallization  of what exists. We preserve. Still, how can we preserve what is  constantly changing, what is happening inside what is built, the use, in  other words, authentic architecture?

Quaderns d’arquitectura i urbanisme is the journal of the Association of Architects of Catalonia

issue #263

Traditionally, preservation has been understood as the crystallization of what exists. We preserve. Still, how can we preserve what is constantly changing, what is happening inside what is built, the use, in other words, authentic architecture?

6 notes

(Source: verenamichelitsch)

4 notes

design : David Carson
cover of “little white lies” magazine, jan. 2011

design : David Carson

cover of “little white lies” magazine, jan. 2011

0 notes

self service magazine

self service magazine

2 notes

(via publicationdesignilike)

290 notes

design : Non-Format
typeface : Accent (free for commercial use display typeface designed by Nelson Balaban)
Available exclusively on Behance Network — Roll over for download link and conditions of use
http://www.behance.net/nelsonbalaban

design : Non-Format

typeface : Accent (free for commercial use display typeface designed by Nelson Balaban)

Available exclusively on Behance Network — Roll over for download link and conditions of use

http://www.behance.net/nelsonbalaban

3 notes

design : BachGärde          Design
Creative design agency from Stockholm, Sweden, with focus on  communication. They are profoundly involved in the whole process from  the very first idea to the final result.
The magazine New Edition represents an idea, an  idea about free word and questioning the prevailing ideals and values.  This must obviously be reflected in the graphic design. The magazine’s  style is inspired by the early asymmetrical typography which grew strong  in Switzerland and Germany in the early 50 century. This style, the  asymmetrical, began as an antithesis to the symmetrical, classical,  typography, and questioned the values that existed for so long. Why! was  the basic idea. Why do you have justified text? Why do you use serif  typeface in body text? Why must the text size be of a certain size? The  classic typography wanted to see the answers as obvious, but it turned  out that it was not quite so simple. The new typography had also logical  answers to the questions. Justified text increased problems and  contributed to ” rivers” in the text unless it was done right (this  problem actually exist still today as the automatic hyphenation is not  optimal).  That san-serifs would be more difficult to read is in many ways a myth.  It is first and foremost with the habit of doing. If today’s young  people learn from an early age to read san-serif in body text, the eye  gets used to it. etc. Typography, form, should therefore in a similar way highlight a genuine  desire to discuss and question current values, thereby creating an  antithesis to the form that today are represented in today’s newspapers.  Instead of being linked to something genuine, todays form are often  more rooted in economic values (where the idea, like fast food chains,  is: we just give the reader what it wants! Challenging the reader and  take responsibility for the creative development is not something we  care about!)

design : BachGärde Design

Creative design agency from Stockholm, Sweden, with focus on communication. They are profoundly involved in the whole process from the very first idea to the final result.

The magazine New Edition represents an idea, an idea about free word and questioning the prevailing ideals and values. This must obviously be reflected in the graphic design. The magazine’s style is inspired by the early asymmetrical typography which grew strong in Switzerland and Germany in the early 50 century. This style, the asymmetrical, began as an antithesis to the symmetrical, classical, typography, and questioned the values that existed for so long. Why! was the basic idea. Why do you have justified text? Why do you use serif typeface in body text? Why must the text size be of a certain size? The classic typography wanted to see the answers as obvious, but it turned out that it was not quite so simple. The new typography had also logical answers to the questions. Justified text increased problems and contributed to ” rivers” in the text unless it was done right (this problem actually exist still today as the automatic hyphenation is not optimal).

That san-serifs would be more difficult to read is in many ways a myth. It is first and foremost with the habit of doing. If today’s young people learn from an early age to read san-serif in body text, the eye gets used to it. etc.

Typography, form, should therefore in a similar way highlight a genuine desire to discuss and question current values, thereby creating an antithesis to the form that today are represented in today’s newspapers. Instead of being linked to something genuine, todays form are often more rooted in economic values (where the idea, like fast food chains, is: we just give the reader what it wants! Challenging the reader and take responsibility for the creative development is not something we care about!)

4 notes

design : A 2 C’est Mieux
Aurore Lameyre & Vincent de Hoÿm

design : A 2 C’est Mieux

Aurore Lameyre & Vincent de Hoÿm

3 notes

PARTICULES N°21
design : Hey HO
particules, free newspaper about contemporary art

PARTICULES N°21

design : Hey HO

particules, free newspaper about contemporary art

3 notes