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brandonschulman:

The theme of Japaneses artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi work is “the physical that permeates into the art piece.” Laser print mounted with plexiglass acrylic and layered in a way that it all come up as some intriguing sculpture installations. ” In a foggy landscape, we no longer see what we are usually able to see – the distance to  the traffic light, the silhouette of the trees, the slope of the ground. Silhouettes, distance and horizontal sense all become vague. When we perceive this vagueness, the water inside the retina and skin dissolve outwardly toward the infinite space of the body surface.

The landscape continues to flow, withholding us from grasping anything solid. By capturing spatial change and the infinite flow of time, I strive to produce art that creates movement between the artwork itself and the viewer’s experience of the artwork.

Photographic Art by: Nobuhiro Nakanishi

Text by: Cyril Foiret

(via forwhoo)

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Mitch Goldstein created a literal poster in motion by stitching together all of the photographic images created during a posters design process into a series of short animations. For this poster for a lecture by designer Craig Ward, he wanted to try to reverse that process—create a still poster by using frames from a piece of motion work.

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design : Non Format

design : Non Format

4 notes

hannahjarvie:

texturism: potholes filled w yarn by juliana santacruz herrera

hannahjarvie:

texturism: potholes filled w yarn by juliana santacruz herrera

(Source: mollyblock, via unkage)

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design : Max Prediger

design : Max Prediger

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design : Superscript²

design : Superscript²

2 notes

2 notes

(via voladoras-deactivated20120130)

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For his latest project, New York-based artist Sebastiaan Bremer  used vintage photos from his childhood and drops of color to produce  images that look sprinkled in kaleidoscopic confetti. “Creating an image  of the world anew through the process of adding is what I like,” he  recently explained to BOMB Magazine.  “By drawing on the photographic image I change everything and add the  real component of time. My associations, ideas, and changes of direction  ― it all finds its way to the picture.”

For his latest project, New York-based artist Sebastiaan Bremer used vintage photos from his childhood and drops of color to produce images that look sprinkled in kaleidoscopic confetti. “Creating an image of the world anew through the process of adding is what I like,” he recently explained to BOMB Magazine. “By drawing on the photographic image I change everything and add the real component of time. My associations, ideas, and changes of direction ― it all finds its way to the picture.”

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